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Graveyard return with video for Please Don’t – taken from their forthcoming album Peace: https://www.loudersound.com/news/graveyard-return-with-video-for-new-song-please-dont …pic.twitter.com/mcEFn3JZbV
This is another song with a true story behind it. The name Layla relates to a book entitled The Story of Layla and Majnun, which tells the tale of Majnun, who falls in love with a beautiful young woman; but her father rejects Majnun and he goes crazy with desire. In real life, guitarist Eric Clapton, the co-writer of “Layla,” fell in love with Patty Boyd, who had married George Harrison. Eventually, though, Boyd and Harrison got a divorce and Clapton then married Boyd. How sweet! Anyway, over the years “Layla” has garnered great popular and critical acclaim. Interestingly, Both Clapton and Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers wrote and played the famous guitar licks throughout the song.
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Critical relief efforts are still going on in Florida, Texas, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and elsewhere to recover from September’s series of hurricanes and earthquakes — and this week there’s a way for you to support those efforts just by listening to music!
This band showed astounding talent in every aspect of music. Listen to any of their songs to listen to Robert Plant’s triple octive voice. Listen to Kashmir or Moby Dick to hear John Bonham’s drum skills or The Lemon Song to hear one of the greatest bass lines ever.
^ Jump up to: a b Danbury (26 May 2015). “CLASSIC ROCK’S TOP SONGS – HERE’S THE I95 MEMORIAL DAY 500 PLAYLIST”. i95 Rock. Retrieved 25 January 2018. “While you partied all weekend, i95 was playing Classic Rock’s top 500 songs. In case you missed it, here’s is our Memorial Day 500 Playlist.”
40 Years of Rock’s Greatest Underdogs… Def Leppard is on the cover of Classic Rock’s April issue, with a new 12 page interview featuring all band members → http://bit.ly/2GZMWbm pic.twitter.com/QiY3ijTY8D
Beach Boys – While The Beatles broke boundaries with their version of British rock, The Beach Boys were hitting it big at the same time with music labeled as Americana. The songs were about surfing, cars and girls and the band remains one of the most popular in the history of music over 50 years later, as they still tour the country.
Every instrumentalist is top-notch; writing and lyrics are fantastic, and no other vocalist could ever beat Steve Perry in his prime. Their songs usually carried a good message which I appreciated. Arnel is good, too, but Perry hit it out of the park every time.
Perhaps the first great acid rock tune, “Purple Haze” was written by guitar god Jimi Hendrix and performed by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Hendrix, a blues and R&B guitarist by trade, quickly learned to play psychedelic blues, essentially inventing the style as he produced the album, Are You Experienced, on which “Purple Haze” appears. The words for the song, seemingly about a man tripping on acid, are simply about a young man going crazy for this foxy lady. No drugs required for that, right?
The Doors – While The Beatles and Beach Boys were all about fun, upbeat rock and roll, The Doors ushered in something very different. Jim Morrison brought the world a very dark and sensual rock and roll music that bordered on lewd and disturbingly controversial. They burned very bright but only lasted eight years before Morrison died at the age of 27.
You have got to be kidding me. Boston is higher than U2? At least U2 did something different to music! Boston made 5 hits. U2 made 15! Name a Boston song more successful than I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For. Plus, U2 was in the rock hall their first year of eligibility. Boston isn’t even it it!
This is the Real School of Rock! The Original Rock and Roll Podcast. Interviews, music and more from a Rock and Roll Geek. All done with a Metal Sludge, Blabbermouth sense of humor for fans of Aerosmith, Cheap Trick, Wildhearts, Metallica, AC/DC,…
“Bohemian Rhapsody” is a prime example of 1970s’ progressive rock. Written by vocalist/pianist Freddy Mercury and performed by Queen, the song is a six-minute suite, including an operatic passage, of all things, and multiple key and tempo changes, and may be the most original of all songs on this stellar list. Not surprisingly, after released, “Bohemian Rhapsody” hit the top of the UK Singles Chart, selling more than nine million copies and kicked butt in the US as well. Astonishingly, the song was re-released in 1992, after the death of Mercury, and did almost as well then. Then in 2004, “Bohemian Rhapsody” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. This awesome song is a prime example of the astonishing range of expression in rock and roll!

39 U2 U2 are an Irish rock band from Dublin. Formed in 1976, the group consists of Bono, the Edge, Adam Clayton, and Larry Mullen Jr. U2’s early sound was rooted in post-punk but eventually grew to incorporate influences from many genres of popular music. Throughout the group’s musical pursuits, they have …read more.
Led Zeppelin – Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham and John Paul Jones were the biggest rock band in the U.S. at one time, and were really the biggest classic rock band on 80s radio. They started their career in 1968, and in a moment of shock to their fans, chose to break up after Bonham died.
Should be #1. Not only Ozzy but also the Heaven and Hell days with Dio and even the Martin era wasn’t bad. Nobody has this longevity and still making great music. What other band here put out an album as recently as Devil You Know that is near that quality?
Included in Pink Floyd’s rock opera, The Wall, “Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)” spawned a single that became Pink Floyd’s only number one hit in the US, UK and other countries. Subtitled “Education,” it’s a protest song about the strict schooling in the UK, particularly as it relates to that in boarding schools. Part 2, written by bassist Roger Waters, as well as all the other “parts” of the song, contains a school choir, a searing and poignant guitar solo by David Gilmour and a disco drum beat, of all things. Members of Pink Floyd resisted making this a single, but we’ll all lucky they changed their minds.
The Rolling Stones are pure genius! Why are they after Queen and AC/DC? Have you heard Wild Horses? Sympathy for the Devil? Gimme Shelter? Paint It Black? These are some of the best songs ever! Doesn’t get any better guys
Classic rock is a radio format which developed from the album-oriented rock (AOR) format in the early 1980s. In the United States, the classic rock format features music ranging generally from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s, primarily focusing on commercially successful hard rock popularized in the 1970s.[1] The radio format became increasingly popular with the baby boomer demographic by the end of the 1990s.[2]
Charlie Starr’s track-by-track guide to @blackberrysmoke’s Find A Light, out today! https://www.loudersound.com/features/charlie-starrs-track-by-track-guide-to-blackberry-smokes-find-a-light …pic.twitter.com/S4lBvArr5G
17 The Jimi Hendrix Experience The Jimi Hendrix Experience was an English-American rock band that formed in Westminster, London, in September 1966. Composed of singer, songwriter, and guitarist Jimi Hendrix, bassist and backing vocalist Noel Redding, and drummer Mitch Mitchell, the band was active until June 1969. During this time …read more.
Performed by the Rolling Stones and written and sang by Mick Jagger, who narrates the song as if he were the devil himself, declaring that he’d wreaked havoc on humanity over the centuries. Interestingly, Jagger’s inspiration for the song came from the books of Baudelaire and Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel The Master and Margarita. Jagger’s intention was that it would be a kind of Bob Dylan song. But it was guitarist Keith Richards’ idea to increase the tempo of the song, add percussion, and give it a samba-like feel. The result – a ballistic rock classic!
This is a list of classic rock songs from the 1960s through the 1990s that are heard on classic rock radio stations.[1][2] Classic rock emerged as a programming format on American FM radio in the mid-1980s—over time, the format evolved to accommodate the shifting demographics of its audience, with programmers including more recent releases to supplement the original songs from the 1960s and 1970s.[3]
A tallied and organized countdown of the best and most influential songs of Classic Rock history. From The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Pink Floyd to Bad Company, Jethro Tull and Elton John. Now you be saying, those are all well known bands and everyone loves them, but we’re not forgetting the lesser known guys. Check it out.
One of seven hit singles from their fabulous album, Hysteria, which sold 25 million copies worldwide, “Pour Some Sugar on Me” became one of the best stripper songs of all time, if nothing else. Also, in case you’re interested, the song reached #2 on VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of the 1980s in 2006; and the video for the song was rated #1 on MTV’s list of the Top 300 Videos of All Time. It seems safe to point out that the tune is synonymous with Def Leppard’s greatest success as a rock group.
Manic Street Preachers release lyric video for their single Liverpool Revisited – taken from new album Resistance Is Futile: https://www.loudersound.com/news/manic-street-preachers-share-lyric-video-for-liverpool-revisited …pic.twitter.com/P5dJzcIQvy
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Led Zeppelin earn the penultimate spot on our Top 100 Classic Rock Songs list with ‘Kashmir,’ a stately, epic masterpiece that refuses to acknowledge that rock music should have any uncrossable boundaries.
44 ZZ Top ZZ Top is an American rock band that formed in 1969 in Houston, Texas. The band is composed of bassist and lead vocalist Dusty Hill, guitarist and lead vocalist Billy Gibbons, and drummer Frank Beard.
Pink Floyd is like that one band that if you show someone the logo for Dark Side, they’ll say “Oh yeah that band, Pink Floyd right? ” Everybody knows it. For example take The Wall, listen to “Another Brick In The Wall Part One, Two and Three.” All three in a row. They blend seamlessly. Listen to the whole album, nonstop. Each song blends perfectly into the next. Pink Floyd brought the famous “If you don’t eat your meat, you can’t have any pudding”. I’m sorry but who the heck hasn’t heard that at least once in their life? For most, it’s avoided with an exception for Dark Side. I hate to say this but… Pink Floyd should take the number one spot, as should The Wall compared to Dark Side. “Mother do you think they’ll the drop the bomb? Mother do you think they’ll like this song? ” -Pink Floyd, Mother, The Wall.
Yes deserves to be on this list because, like Queen, they were totally unique and very talented musically. Hard to believe bands like Motley Crue are above them. Any decent cover band can play a Motley Crue song as well as the original, but no one even attempts Yes songs because you have to be great musically.
Sometimes the best songs have the simplest licks. Guitarist Keith Richards created the main guitar lick in “Satisfaction,” a three-note riff played with a Gibson fuzzbox, which made the guitar sound like a saxophone, with which Richards hoped to replace it at some point – but the producers said no way Jose. Anyway, the song was performed live for the first time on Shindig!, an American TV show on which everything was performed live. You gotta love it! Many Boomers probably remember watching this memorable show. Not surprisingly, Rolling Stone magazine picked “Satisfaction” #2 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.
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